Messages & Channelings

My coaching client Sara had agreed to a business dinner with a fellow she found quite difficult to work with after she made the appointment. Now, the morning before the dinner, she was looking for a way to get out of it.

Alan Cohen > A Heartbeat to Remember

One day all of our hearts will stop beating, but while they still pulse we would do well to count them all as precious. Every heartbeat represents God’s intention that you have a purpose in the world and a reason to be alive. While many of us believe we are here to achieve a notable act or make lots of money, our real mission is based on the quality of our relationships.

Alan Cohen > Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

A student told her spiritual teacher that she was suffering under “the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,” quoting Shakespeare’s famous verse from Hamlet. The teacher looked her piercingly in the eyes and asked, “Are you so sure that fortune is outrageous and it must bear slings and arrows?”

Alan Cohen > Humbled and Exalted

Would you mop the floor of someone who defeated you? Probably not. Yet there might be gold in such an experience.

Alan Cohen > Getting Sober

I recently learned of the death of a musician I admire. Ruud was a trombonist in André Rieu’s orchestra. Besides being a talented musician, he was something of a comic spark plug, performing clever antics in skits the orchestra wove into their performances.

Alan Cohen > A Tale of Two Fathers

All good people do some bad things and all bad people do some good things. Each of us must learn from the example that others show us, especially from the fruits of their actions.

Alan Cohen > The World You Prefer

One of my favorite movies is the Truman Show, in which a man has unknowingly been born and raised on a massive TV set on which the entire world watches his life unfold. Eventually Truman begins to discover that the life he has been living is contrived, and he attempts to escape the tiny world in which he is trapped.

Alan Cohen > Remember What’s Important

A Course in Miracles tells us that the world we see is inside out and upside down. We value the trivial and overlook the monumental. We are enamored with things and ignore people. We worship at the altar of limitation and forsake our potential. We live disconnected from the worthwhile and then wonder why we are in pain.

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