Messages & Channelings

I’ve just finished the “I Can Do It” conference here in Toronto and, before I go to bed, I wanted to share some of my notes with you from an extraordinary documentary that was shown at lunch today. The movie was called, Doors Opening, and it’s the story of the work Louise Hay did with men who were suffering with AIDS in the mid eighties. During a time when most people literally shunned these men, Louise welcomed them into her home and her heart, and taught them how to heal. The film is a moving example of the power of love – both self love and the selfless love of a woman committed to being of service. Here are several things Louise suggests we do in order to love ourselves more:

Every year around this time, I invite you to stop and reflect on the positive changes you’ve made in your life.  Since the quality of your life is directly related to the quality of relationship you have with yourself, it’s important to be your own best champion. When you feel good about who you are, you allow better things – people, experiences, jobs, opportunities, etc. – into your life. Taking the time to inventory your positive changes is an important step in developing this stronger relationship. And it’s a key way to reinforce good habits.

This summer I'm falling in love with life. After a very busy year in 2012, I'm enjoying being home more, giving time and attention to the things I say I value, and deepening my relationship with myself by exploring new ways of expressing my essence and creativity. 

It was 10:30 when the oppressive summer heat finally gave way to cool night air that kept the mosquitoes at bay. I plopped down on a zero gravity chair in the middle of our deck, pushed back on the arms, and came face-to-face with a stunning, cloudless sky.

Cheryl Richardson > Who Are The Sheep In Your Herd?

I’m no longer willing to spend the precious time I have left on the planet dodging sarcasm, feigning interest in boring topics, or defending my choice to live an examined life.

Cheryl Richardson > Speak Kindly: Stop beating yourself up

Last week I had a conversation with a friend who was disappointed in herself for not achieving a goal that she intended to accomplish. As I listened to her talk about what she could have done differently, I was amazed at how hard she was on herself.  Really hard.  Isn’t it strange how we actually think that berating ourselves will somehow make a positive difference? 

This morning I watched a recorded segment from an Oprah Show that told the story of a woman, Angela, who prayed with a young man who attempted to rob her at gunpoint while she worked behind the counter in her office. I imagine many of you may have heard about the story. Out of fear and desperation, she begged the man to spare her life and then started praying out loud asking to be protected.

Cheryl Richardson > How to see Resentment as an Invitation

Last week, while listening to a program about self-care coping strategies, I heard a therapist talk about what she recommends to clients who feel resentful – a harmful, debilitating state of mind.

Last year I joined a local Facebook group started by a woman who lives in our small town. Members of the group share local news, offer referrals for home repairs, help find lost pets, and make requests for support.

The other night I enjoyed a wonderful dinner with one of my soul sisters. You know, the kind of close friend who's been with you forever, knows you in ways you don't know yourself, always has your best interest at heart, and takes a stand for your strength when you feel vulnerable or unsure of yourself? 

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