Messages & Channelings

Cheryl Richardson > The Great Opening

This afternoon, after doing a bit of work and making pesto from basil in the garden, I was washing up at the kitchen sink when a wave of anxiety hit. I felt myself brace at the familiar, unpleasant feeling.

My friend Debbie Ford passed away last week after a long battle with cancer.  I still can’t fathom the idea that I’ll never hear her voice, enjoy lounging on a hotel bed like schoolgirls conspiring to balance work and play, or watch her deliver a wise and wild talk on stage. The world won’t be the same without her sweet presence.

Cheryl Richardson > Enter the “You’ve Paid Your Dues” stage of life

After my dad died last November, I made a deeper commitment to my own health. Watching him go in and out of hospitals treated by well-intentioned, yet overburdened caregivers, made me vow to do whatever I could to stay out of that system.

Cheryl Richardson > How to Be a Good Human

As the pandemic picks up steam in some parts of the country and we continue with restrictions, it seems we’re being invited to make a relationship with uncertainty whether we want to or not.

There are some days when I feel like a fraud. I catch myself teaching one thing and practicing another. I forget what I know to be true, get scared or knocked off track, and fall into old habits that don't work.

Cheryl Richardson > A Call for Compassion

When we get scared or triggered by something that makes us feel powerless or afraid, we tend to go from being full-functioning, clear-thinking adults, to children who act impulsively. 

As I think about the upcoming year, I have no doubt there will be challenges. There’s so much happening on the planet right now and it’s easy to feel anxious about our future.

Last week my sister Kerri invited me to attend a lecture at a local library called, “ It’s Not About The Hike.“  Pat and Nancy, gals in their 50?s, started walking on their neighborhood sidewalks and eventually ended up climbing the 100 highest mountains in New England.

“We must be completely present for what we are doing, without sacrificing or rushing what’s in front of us in order to get to ‘more important’ stuff later. No matter how mundane the activity, treat everything as important and take pleasure in it.

Rather than set new goals or make resolutions, I decided to build on what’s working already. Here are some of the guidelines I want to use in 2015.

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